Scientific Proof of God, A New and Modern Bible, and Coexisting Relations of God and the Universe

Thursday, February 19, 2015

749.Turning the Minds of Physical Scientists Toward God

Galileo's book, Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences, is not accepted by today's physical scientists. On page 34 of Galileo's book, today's physical scientists reject the bodies that Galileo defined as a continuous quantity built up of an infinite number of indivisibles.

If today's physical scientists would have accepted Galileo's indivisibles, an infinite number of things-in-themselves would form a universe that has no end. Instead, today's physical scientists only talk about a Big Bang explosion and atoms. So, many scientists today only teach about a universe that had a beginning and has an end.

Today's physical scientists began to appear in the 1970s when drug use was increasing and the U.S. economy was failing. So, in order to hold the nation, science, and religions together, in 1966 Raymond J. Seeger, of the U.S. National Science Foundation, wrote the book, Galileo Galilee, his life and his works. In this book, it is clear that Seeger was telling today's scientists that the universe is a continuum, that Galileo is a religious man of science, and that Galileo defined all bodies as a continuous quantity built up of an infinite number of indivisibles.

Today, some scientists are returning their minds to an eternal God and the universe. Beyond my own books below on coexistent opposites, I say that the following books will turn a scientist onto the correct path: (1 )Galileo's book; (2) Seeger's book; (3) Georg Cantor's work on transfinite numbers; and (4) Donald Hatch Andrews' work on music and vibrations and his book on The Symphony of Life.

My books about God and the Universe are presented below:

1. The First Scientific Proof of God (2006), 271 pages, (click)
2. A New and Modern Holy Bible (2012), 189 pages.
3. God And His Coexistent Relations To the Universe. (2014), 429 pages

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